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Htaccess Directory Directive Internal Server Error

Start here for a quick overview of the site Help Center Detailed answers to any questions you might have Meta Discuss the workings and policies of this site About Us Learn more about Stack Overflow the company Business Learn more about hiring developers or posting ads with us Server Fault Questions Tags Users Badges Unanswered Ask Question _ Server Fault is a question and answer site for system and network administrators. Join them; it only takes a minute: Sign up Here's how it works: Anybody can ask a question Anybody can answer The best answers are voted up and rise to the top 500 Error when using Apache Directory Directive up vote 0 down vote favorite I am trying to restrict access to certain directories to certain IP's.... I have done some research & the below is what I came up with, however it returns a 500 internal server error when I try & access the page.. order deny,allow deny from all allow from 123.45.67.89 allow from 111.222.333.444 allow from 123.45.*.* allow from 123.44.*.* order deny,allow deny from all allow from 123.45.67.89 allow from 111.222.333.444 allow from 123.45.*.* allow from 123.44.*.* What did I do wrong!? apache-2.2 .htaccess directory share|improve this question asked Mar 10 '13 at 14:47 Brett 184110 add a comment| 1 Answer 1 active oldest votes up vote 1 down vote That's not how IP address ranges in the Allow directive work. The * symbol is not in the docs. You can either write: Allow from 123.45 or Allow from 123.45.0.0/255.255.0.0 or Allow from 123.45.0.0/16 There are other allowed syntax but I find the CIDR notation to be the clearest and most readable. share|improve this answer answered Mar 11 '13 at 11:16 Ladadadada 18.9k43270 add a comment| Your Answer draft saved draft discarded Sign up or log in Sign up using Google Sign up using Facebook Sign up using Email and Password Post as a guest Name Email Post as a guest Name Email d

here for a quick overview of the site Help Center Detailed answers to any questions you might have Meta Discuss the workings and policies of this site About Us Learn more about Stack Overflow the company Business Learn more about hiring developers or posting ads with us Stack Overflow Questions Jobs Documentation Tags Users Badges Ask Question x Dismiss Join the Stack Overflow Community Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other. Join them; it http://serverfault.com/questions/486430/500-error-when-using-apache-directory-directive only takes a minute: Sign up htaccess Deny from all and 500 Internal Server Error up vote 1 down vote favorite I want to restrict direct access to a specific directory (and all the files inside) on my local server. The directory is: C:/Server/www/project/html/ I've tried the following code (.htaccess is placed in www directory - /project/html/ doesn't work too): http://stackoverflow.com/questions/6956822/htaccess-deny-from-all-and-500-internal-server-error "C:/Server/www/project/html/"> AllowOverride all Order Deny,Allow Deny from all However, it causes 500 Internal Server Error and I can't understand why. Apache error log: [Fri Aug 05 16:06:01 2011] [alert] [client 127.0.0.1] C:/Server/www/.htaccess:

and How to Fix ThemIs your Apache htaccess not working? Here are the top reasons why an htaccess file may not work, and how get your htaccess working.Htaccess Problem #1: No Dot Before the FilenameThe .htaccess file's filename must start with a dot, like so:.htaccessFiles and directory names starting http://smartwebdeveloper.com/apache/htaccess-problems with a dot are treated as hidden files by Unix, Linux & Mac. The https://httpd.apache.org/docs/2.4/mod/core.html htaccess file is hidden so it doesn't distract from normal web content like HTML files. See hidden files for more information.Without the dot at the beginning, Apache will ignore the htaccess file.Htaccess Problem #2: Filename Not All LowercaseIf an htaccess file's name contains uppercase letters, it generally will not work on Linux or htaccess directory Unix. This is because filenames on Linux and Unix are usually case sensitive. If an htaccess file has any uppercase letters, e.g. .HTACCESS or .HTaccess, Apache won't find the htaccess file. The htaccess is ignored.An htaccess file containing uppercase letters generall will work on Windows and Mac. This is because filenames on these platforms are generally case insensitive. I'd recommend sticking with lowercase, so your websites are portable htaccess directory directive to Linux servers. The use of uppercase letters could also circumvent Apache directives designed to prevent the contents of .htaccess files read from the web.Htaccess Problem #3: Filename MisspeltCommon misspellings of the htaccess file's name are htacess and htacess. Check the filename has two c's and two s's.Htaccess Problem #4: Htaccess Disabled by AllowOverride SettingOn some servers, Apache is configured to ignore some or all directives in .htaccess files. This is for security reasons. The AllowOverride directive controls which features will be allowed in .htaccess files. For example AllowOverride None can turn off htaccess files for a folder and its subfolders.Check your Apache configuration file for which AllowOverride directive is applied to the directory containing your problem htaccess file.If you're not sure which configuration file to look in, start with the main Apache configuration file httpd.conf or apache2.conf. If your website is configured in a file included by httpd.conf (e.g. a virtual hosts configuration file), you will need to look in that file. See Location of httpd.conf on CentOS, Ubuntu, Mac and others to locate your httpd.conf.To enable using a .htaccess file, change AllowOverride None to AllowOverride All.For example, for a CentOS 5.3 server, I needed to change the AllowOverride setti

Server features that are always available Status:Core Directives AcceptFilter AcceptPathInfo AccessFileName AddDefaultCharset AllowEncodedSlashes AllowOverride AllowOverrideList CGIMapExtension CGIPassAuth CGIVar ContentDigest DefaultRuntimeDir DefaultType Define DocumentRoot EnableMMAP EnableSendfile Error ErrorDocument ErrorLog ErrorLogFormat ExtendedStatus FileETag ForceType GprofDir HostnameLookups Include IncludeOptional KeepAlive KeepAliveTimeout LimitInternalRecursion LimitRequestBody LimitRequestFields LimitRequestFieldSize LimitRequestLine LimitXMLRequestBody LogLevel MaxKeepAliveRequests MaxRangeOverlaps MaxRangeReversals MaxRanges MergeTrailers Mutex NameVirtualHost Options Protocol Protocols ProtocolsHonorOrder QualifyRedirectURL RLimitCPU RLimitMEM RLimitNPROC ScriptInterpreterSource SeeRequestTail ServerAdmin ServerAlias ServerName ServerPath ServerRoot ServerSignature ServerTokens SetHandler SetInputFilter SetOutputFilter TimeOut TraceEnable UnDefine UseCanonicalName UseCanonicalPhysicalPort Bugfix checklisthttpd changelogKnown issuesReport a bugSee also Comments AcceptFilter Directive Description:Configures optimizations for a Protocol's Listener Sockets Syntax:*1 Context:server config Status:Core Module:core This directive enables operating system specific optimizations for a listening socket by the *0 type. The basic premise is for the kernel to not send a socket to the server process until either data is received or an entire HTTP Request is buffered. Only FreeBSD's Accept Filters, Linux's more primitive _default_9, and Windows' optimized AcceptEx() are currently supported. Using _default_8 for an argument will disable any accept filters for that protocol. This is useful for protocols that require a server send

 
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