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arguments, is both valuable and increasingly rare. Fallacious reasoning keeps us from knowing the truth, and the inability to think critically makes us vulnerable to manipulation by those skilled in the art of rhetoric. What is a Logical Fallacy? A logical fallacy is,

Inductive Fallacy Definition

roughly speaking, an error of reasoning. When someone adopts a position, or tries to persuade logical fallacy someone else to adopt a position, based on a bad piece of reasoning, they commit a fallacy. I say “roughly speaking” because this fallacious reasoning definition definition has a few problems, the most important of which are outlined below. Some logical fallacies are more common than others, and so have been named and defined. When people speak of logical fallacies they often mean to

Hasty Generalization

refer to this collection of well-known errors of reasoning, rather than to fallacies in the broader, more technical sense given above. Formal and Informal Fallacies There are several different ways in which fallacies may be categorised. It’s possible, for instance, to distinguish between formal fallacies and informal fallacies. Formal Fallacies (Deductive Fallacies) Philosophers distinguish between two types of argument: deductive and inductive. For each type of argument, there is a different understanding of what counts as a

False Cause Fallacy

fallacy. Deductive arguments are supposed to be water-tight. For a deductive argument to be a good one (to be “valid”) it must be absolutely impossible for both its premises to be true and its conclusion to be false. With a good deductive argument, that simply cannot happen; the truth of the premises entails the truth of the conclusion. The classic example of a deductively valid argument is: (1) All men are mortal. (2) Socrates is a man. Therefore: (3) Socrates is mortal. It is simply not possible that both (1) and (2) are true and (3) is false, so this argument is deductively valid. Any deductive argument that fails to meet this (very high) standard commits a logical error, and so, technically, is fallacious. This includes many arguments that we would usually accept as good arguments, arguments that make their conclusions highly probable, but not certain. Arguments of this kind, arguments that aren’t deductively valid, are said to commit a “formal fallacy”. Informal Fallacies Inductive arguments needn’t be as rigorous as deductive arguments in order to be good arguments. Good inductive arguments lend support to their conclusions, but even if their premises are true then that doesn’t establish with 100% certainty that their conclusions are true. Even a good inductive argument with true premises might have a false conclusion; that the argument is a good one and that

arguments, is both valuable and increasingly rare. Fallacious reasoning keeps us from knowing the truth, and the inability to think critically makes us vulnerable to manipulation types of fallacies by those skilled in the art of rhetoric. What is a

Fallacy Examples

Logical Fallacy? A logical fallacy is, roughly speaking, an error of reasoning. When someone adopts a position, or slippery slope fallacy tries to persuade someone else to adopt a position, based on a bad piece of reasoning, they commit a fallacy. I say “roughly speaking” because this definition has a few http://www.logicalfallacies.info/ problems, the most important of which are outlined below. Some logical fallacies are more common than others, and so have been named and defined. When people speak of logical fallacies they often mean to refer to this collection of well-known errors of reasoning, rather than to fallacies in the broader, more technical sense given above. Formal and Informal Fallacies There http://www.logicalfallacies.info/ are several different ways in which fallacies may be categorised. It’s possible, for instance, to distinguish between formal fallacies and informal fallacies. Formal Fallacies (Deductive Fallacies) Philosophers distinguish between two types of argument: deductive and inductive. For each type of argument, there is a different understanding of what counts as a fallacy. Deductive arguments are supposed to be water-tight. For a deductive argument to be a good one (to be “valid”) it must be absolutely impossible for both its premises to be true and its conclusion to be false. With a good deductive argument, that simply cannot happen; the truth of the premises entails the truth of the conclusion. The classic example of a deductively valid argument is: (1) All men are mortal. (2) Socrates is a man. Therefore: (3) Socrates is mortal. It is simply not possible that both (1) and (2) are true and (3) is false, so this argument is deductively valid. Any deductive argument that fails to meet this (very high) standard commits a logical error, and so, technically, is fallacious. This inclu

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In a Gateway Event Script the errors still appear, but because there is no GUI associated with it, they don't show up for the user to see. One might think that these errors would be generated and logged in the Ignition Gateway Console utility, but unfortunately due to how logging works internally this is not the case. These errors are indeed logged and there are a couple places where you can go to find inspect these error messages. Ignition's wrapper.log All of the error messages from your Gateway Event Scripts are logged to one file: wrapper.log. You can find this file in the install directory under Version 7.3+ \Inductive Automation\Ignition\logs\wrapper.log Version 7.2- \Inductive Automation\Ignition\wrapper.log When you open this file, scroll to the bottom to see the newest messages. If you have just started Ignition for the first time you will see something like this: STATUS|wrapper|2011/11/2310:47:09|-->WrapperStartedasService STATUS|wrapper|2011/11/2310:47:09|JavaServiceWrapperStandardEdition 32-bit3.5.4 STATUS|wrapper|2011/11/2310:47:09|Copyright(C)1999-2010TanukiSoftware, Ltd.AllRightsReserved. STATUS|wrapper|2011/11/2310:47:09|http://wrapper.tanukisoftware.com STATUS|wrapper|2011/11/2310:47:09|LicensedtoInductiveAutomationfor IgnitionGateway STATUS|wrapper|2011/11/2310:47:09| STATUS|wrapper|2011/11/2310:47:09|LaunchingaJVM... INFO|jvm1|2011/11/2310:47:09|WrapperManager:Initializing... INFO|jvm1|2011/11/2310:47:10|Nov23,201110:47:10AMorg.apache.catalina. startup.Embeddedstart INFO|jvm1|2011/11/2310:47:10|INFO:Startingtomcatserver INFO|jvm1|2011/11/2310:47:10|Nov23,201110:47:10AMorg.apache.catalina. core.StandardEnginestart INFO|jvm1|2011/11/2310:47:10|INFO:StartingServletEngine:ApacheTomcat/ 6.0.18 This file is in constant use by the Ignition system and is being modified in realtime. It is recommended that you download a tool like Wintail that will allow you to view the tail-end (hence the name) of the changing wrapper.log without having to constantly reopen the file. Output

 
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